garden thoughts

As a non-gardener, I’m easily impressed with those who have a knack for all things green and growing. I wrote about childhood memories of my dad’s garden earlier this year, and though Dad’s not raising a crop of squash and pumpkins at the moment, he does tame the woods with his chainsaw until it’s an oasis of gorgeous views and peaceful trails.

Recently, though, it was my father-in-law Gerald’s backyard garden that knocked my socks off. I’ve included a video “walk-through” below.

Gerald’s project is meaningful on many levels. It’s an example of re-purposing things that others might discard — the raised beds were constructed primarily from old shipping pallets.

It’s a leafy monument to perseverance through tough times. My father-in-law has battled a serious kidney disorder for almost two years but did not let illness keep him from creating beauty.

And it’s also purposeful and beneficial, providing vegetables that help rejuvenate the body and a joyful hobby that blesses the mind and spirit.

You all know I’m itching to talk about spiritual parallels right now, but I’m going to save them for a future post. For now, enjoy your tour of Gerald’s garden with these ideas in mind:

What’s old can be made new.

What’s hard can become good.

What’s grown can give new gifts.

 

 

finding small somethings: a few thoughts on the power of inertia

finding small somethings: a few thoughts on the power of inertia

I just came from coffee with a friend where we talked about the concept of inertia. She lamented that she hasn’t fully come out of the post-Easter slump. I commiserated because we both found ourselves lacking discipline to do some of the things we know we need to do — things like being consistent with workouts and nutrition, getting a handle on the budget, being faithful in spiritual disciplines.

These are all areas we care about and have been working on all year, but once a trip or an unexpected setback interrupts a routine, once things slow down or stop in an area, we tend to remain in a state of inactivity. Indeed, “a tendency to do nothing or remain unchanged” is one of the definitions of inertia. Continue reading “finding small somethings: a few thoughts on the power of inertia”